Where did the English people in historical Englind get their traditional hair wigs?

Question by wiu_stu: Where did the English people in historical Englind get their traditional hair wigs?
I say this is relative to the dominance of Catholicism which ruled Europe in the 13th-14th century, or possibly the rule of a queen like the present times.
Compliments of “The Ole Fogey and Mr. Landers”

Best answer:

Answer by M to the R Mighty RA
They were a fashion accessory in the 1700’s,

What do you think? Answer below!

One thought on “Where did the English people in historical Englind get their traditional hair wigs?

  1. The Dark Side

    You say that: I say no. Wigs only became popular in England in the 16th century. It was a fashion more than anything, and also was an answer to bad hygiene. The upper classes quite often shaved their heads and wore a wig instead – it was easier to wash the wig to get rid of head lice.

    By the early 19th century they went out of fashion, but they are still worn to this day in British courts. English law has two types of lawyers, barristers and solicitors. Only barristers are permitted to prosecute and defend in courts above the lowest level so if you are taken to court for a more than minor offence you have to pay for two lawyers – only a solicitor can instruct a barrister. It is still the case that a barrister cannot officially be heard unless they are properly dressed in a horsehair wig and gown, and the judge will be in wig and judge’s robes too. Exceptions are allowed just occasionally – when I did jury service, the judge gave permission on a couple of days for counsel to take their wigs off as it was very hot.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


*